mtnstudio:

hello!  updates soon to come. install shots from recent shows + choppin up new projects + completely redesigning my website + literally and figuratively setting things on fire. in the mean time enjoy this nice lady watering the plants at forest home. xo

tryna get back on my grind

mtnstudio:

hello!  updates soon to come. install shots from recent shows + choppin up new projects + completely redesigning my website + literally and figuratively setting things on fire. in the mean time enjoy this nice lady watering the plants at forest home. xo

tryna get back on my grind

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INSIDE \ WITHIN

mtnstudio: heeeeyyyyyyy

Hey!  I got interviewed on inside/within!  Ashleigh and Kate were amazing and so much fun to talk to.  They’ve interviewed with a really stellar cast of Chicago based artists and I am so delighted to be on that list. Check out our conversation and other artist interviews on their site!

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Issue 07

mtnstudio:

I’m very excited to announce my first international interview.  It was great talking with Casey from the Meander over the last few months!  Give it a look!

BOOM! This rules!

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goingquiet:

Yayoi Kusama with Infinity Mirrored Room - The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away, 2013

My hero photographed by my other hero

goingquiet:

Yayoi Kusama with Infinity Mirrored Room - The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away, 2013

My hero photographed by my other hero

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get it girl!

melissakagerer:

Outtakes of Maritime and Populux Brewery  that I shot for Seattle Magazine’s October Issue 

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Daniel is killing it.  go to his things!

danielshea:

A few upcoming exhibitions, one opens tonight in New York. I’ll be in Kansas City working on a site-specific installation for the Plug Projects opening as well.
5x5 Real Un Real
One Art Space, New York, NY
November 7th 2013 – November 30th 2013.
Opening: November 7th, 6 – 9pm
Lost and Found
Plug Projects, Kansas City, KC
November 15, 2013 - January 4, 2014 
Opening: November 15th 6-9 PM
Artist Talk
Kansas City Art Institute, Sculpture Department
November 13, 2013, 8:15-9:15 AM
2014:
-Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Chicago, TBA (solo)
-Museum of Contemporary Photography, Phantoms in the Dirt
-Heaven Gallery, Chicago, TBA

Daniel is killing it.  go to his things!

danielshea:

A few upcoming exhibitions, one opens tonight in New York. I’ll be in Kansas City working on a site-specific installation for the Plug Projects opening as well.

One Art Space, New York, NY

November 7th 2013 – November 30th 2013.

Opening: November 7th, 6 – 9pm

Plug Projects, Kansas City, KC

November 15, 2013 - January 4, 2014 

Opening: November 15th 6-9 PM

Kansas City Art Institute, Sculpture Department

November 13, 2013, 8:15-9:15 AM


2014:

-Andrew Rafacz Gallery, Chicago, TBA (solo)

-Museum of Contemporary Photography, Phantoms in the Dirt

-Heaven Gallery, Chicago, TBA

(Source: danielshea)

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ALL OF THIS IS ROCKET SCIENCE: A studio visit with Joe Leavenworth

rocketscience:

image

photographs by Harry Gould Harvey IV

Where is your studio exactly and how long have you been working there?
I live and work in Bed-Stuy Brooklyn. I’ve been there since January.

image

What are the pros and cons of your studio?
Pros: Great light, I don’t have to manage two rents and I can…

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beodddierich:

Be Odd Die(d) Rich

beodddierich:

Be Odd Die(d) Rich

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danielshea:

Image Above: Cait Oppermann
WEBSITE COMING! Women in Photo…
I’m excited to announce that my friend Kimmy Fung is working on a website to house this conversation about sexism in editorial photography. The site will include links to various responses, new discussions, and a directory of working women by region. 
If you’d like to be involved or make contact, please email womeninphoto@gmail.com. She/we are looking for donations to cover hosting and production costs. If a handful of people donate $10, she will be set (one year is looking to cost around $100). Please email the above address to get info on making a donation. I’ll have more info as it develops. 
More Responses
The discussion gained traction online, most notably over at PDN Pulse and A Photo Editor. As to be expected, the comments reveal some interesting and sometimes disheartening perspectives. PetaPixel also posted a follow up response. 
And from the Tumblr blogs:

Most art buyers and photo editors are female; they’re doing the hiring.  Why this is, I don’t know, nor will I speculate.  It is insulting to start mentioning things like “they couldn’t be photographers themselves so they became editors.” I went to London in March to meet with art buyers and met two males (practically the only ones in Europe!) who joked about having a protest to get more male art buyers into the profession. Yet females in the workplace don’t often get along. There are a lot of subtle power struggles, subconscious jealousy, and sometimes females just plain don’t like each other.  A lot of this begins in junior high. Anyone who has survived junior high can attest to this.  There are a few “female photographer” photo groups out there, but is there any female group that in any way compares to the supergroup of the good-looking editorial guys in their 20s and 30s who shoot everything? (You know who I’m talking about.) No.  We don’t band together in the same way. And that’s fine.  It’s just worth noting. In a way, I can understand why female photo editors are hiring men—there’s that playfulness in your interactions which you can pull off with someone of the opposite sex.  It’s human nature.  I have way more guy friends than female friends.  Most of my photo assistants on big jobs are men. Why am I not hiring women either?  It’s a good question.  Does any of this mean I don’t get a sting when my all the cute local guy photographers 8 years younger than me are now shooting for the publications I shot for a few months ago? Or when I see the list of photographers in an issue and it’s literally all dudes? Of course not.  All of these issues should be aired out and made plain, and hiring decisions should of course ultimately come from the work. But it’s naive to think that there isn’t a social dynamic that is a huge factor.

-Elizabeth Weinberg

It’s no secret that there are basically mostly female photo editors and male photographers.  In some ways, it’s nice to see so many women in a position to commission photographers, but to be honest, there isn’t a lot of commissioning female photographers.  My saying this isn’t girl on girl hate, it’s just a fact.  I couldn’t tell you why, but for some reason, it seems like photo editors are either pressured to or feel more comfortable hiring men.  Repeatedly.  Over and over.  The same men.  Men who are often wonderful photographers, but in no way more qualified or “better” than a sea of equally (if not sometimes more) talented women.

-Cait Oppermann 

So if we can determine that it doesn’t matter what people in the hiring position think, what do we do about the fact that there is a very real imbalance between male and female photographers getting jobs in the commercial world?
My friend Pete and I were discussing the topic on a recent hike. We decided to grab as many magazines in his house as we could find, and count how many assigned shoots were done by men and how many were done by women. We tried to pick a cross section of magazines and who they were written for such as: people that love the outdoors, men’s fashion, women’s fashion, travel, etc. We counted the shoots from 5 magazines.
The following ratios reflect how many shoots were awarded to men vs. women:
6:2, 9:1, 8:0, 11:3, 10:1
I went home and counted more:
12:0, 4:4, 8:1, 12:4, 5:4, 10:4

-Angie Smith

And yes, I find that most photo editors are females which is exactly why I find it even more upsetting that males are dominating the editorial world. If photo editors feel that using female photographers would shift their aesthetic, because we don’t have that male viewpoint, then they should let their aesthetic change a bit in order to include women

-Yael Malka
Jennilee Marigomen and I have also been talking about Canada specifically, and she says:

Although the market is a smaller scale here in Canada, I can agree with a lot of the points you have made from what I see happening here, but more so in other places. Because I have a full-time job, I am not actively pursuing work with magazines, so I haven’t really experienced sexism first hand. Because there is less work here, I am always humbled when I get commissions with my aesthetic in mind. 
As a side project, I work on an online magazine and receive photography submissions on a regular basis. Most of the pitches and submissions I receive are from males. Every person that has approached me about meeting to look at their portfolio has been male. I believe that I am pretty equal when it comes to commissioning and featuring work by photographers. I don’t concern myself with the gender of the artist and think that beautiful work is beautiful work. But I can only work with what is presented to me.
When I think of my favorite photographers, many of them are women. When I think of the successful female photographers I have met in different cities, they all have something in common - they are very inspiringly strong and confident women who do not shy away from sharing their work. Their work is as strong as their backbone. I guess these qualities are considered to be more masculine. They are the ones who win awards, competitions, get gallery shows, and land big clients.
I talked about this with a friend who works in the Product Design industry, also male dominated. Something he has seen over his years in Canada and Europe is that although the work can be good, there is sometimes a lack of confidence amongst some women. However, the ones who are confident stand out and the issue of them being a women is not relevant. 
I agree that photography has a long history of being a boys club and there are many factors that play into this - the pigeonholed female vs the male aesthetic, favoritism, sexism, gender stereotypes, etc. All very important topics. But one thing I can agree with is that when it comes to numbers males are more aggressive when it comes to approaching art buyers and photo editors, who see hundreds of portfolios a week.  And the females who I believe do the same are the ones who are successful. And I think that the people who do the hiring prefer to work with people that have a relationship.
In response to the point of female Photo Editors mainly hiring male photographers, I have almost always worked with female Photo Editors, all who have been very nice.

danielshea:

Image Above: Cait Oppermann

WEBSITE COMING! Women in Photo…

I’m excited to announce that my friend Kimmy Fung is working on a website to house this conversation about sexism in editorial photography. The site will include links to various responses, new discussions, and a directory of working women by region. 

If you’d like to be involved or make contact, please email womeninphoto@gmail.com. She/we are looking for donations to cover hosting and production costs. If a handful of people donate $10, she will be set (one year is looking to cost around $100). Please email the above address to get info on making a donation. I’ll have more info as it develops. 

More Responses

The discussion gained traction online, most notably over at PDN Pulse and A Photo Editor. As to be expected, the comments reveal some interesting and sometimes disheartening perspectives. PetaPixel also posted a follow up response

And from the Tumblr blogs:

Most art buyers and photo editors are female; they’re doing the hiring.  Why this is, I don’t know, nor will I speculate.  It is insulting to start mentioning things like “they couldn’t be photographers themselves so they became editors.” I went to London in March to meet with art buyers and met two males (practically the only ones in Europe!) who joked about having a protest to get more male art buyers into the profession. Yet females in the workplace don’t often get along. There are a lot of subtle power struggles, subconscious jealousy, and sometimes females just plain don’t like each other.  A lot of this begins in junior high. Anyone who has survived junior high can attest to this.  There are a few “female photographer” photo groups out there, but is there any female group that in any way compares to the supergroup of the good-looking editorial guys in their 20s and 30s who shoot everything? (You know who I’m talking about.) No.  We don’t band together in the same way. And that’s fine.  It’s just worth noting. In a way, I can understand why female photo editors are hiring men—there’s that playfulness in your interactions which you can pull off with someone of the opposite sex.  It’s human nature.  I have way more guy friends than female friends.  Most of my photo assistants on big jobs are men. Why am I not hiring women either?  It’s a good question.  Does any of this mean I don’t get a sting when my all the cute local guy photographers 8 years younger than me are now shooting for the publications I shot for a few months ago? Or when I see the list of photographers in an issue and it’s literally all dudes? Of course not.  All of these issues should be aired out and made plain, and hiring decisions should of course ultimately come from the work. But it’s naive to think that there isn’t a social dynamic that is a huge factor.

-Elizabeth Weinberg

It’s no secret that there are basically mostly female photo editors and male photographers.  In some ways, it’s nice to see so many women in a position to commission photographers, but to be honest, there isn’t a lot of commissioning female photographers.  My saying this isn’t girl on girl hate, it’s just a fact.  I couldn’t tell you why, but for some reason, it seems like photo editors are either pressured to or feel more comfortable hiring men.  Repeatedly.  Over and over.  The same men.  Men who are often wonderful photographers, but in no way more qualified or “better” than a sea of equally (if not sometimes more) talented women.

-Cait Oppermann 

So if we can determine that it doesn’t matter what people in the hiring position think, what do we do about the fact that there is a very real imbalance between male and female photographers getting jobs in the commercial world?

My friend Pete and I were discussing the topic on a recent hike. We decided to grab as many magazines in his house as we could find, and count how many assigned shoots were done by men and how many were done by women. We tried to pick a cross section of magazines and who they were written for such as: people that love the outdoors, men’s fashion, women’s fashion, travel, etc. We counted the shoots from 5 magazines.

The following ratios reflect how many shoots were awarded to men vs. women:

6:2, 9:1, 8:0, 11:3, 10:1

I went home and counted more:

12:0, 4:4, 8:1, 12:4, 5:4, 10:4

-Angie Smith

And yes, I find that most photo editors are females which is exactly why I find it even more upsetting that males are dominating the editorial world. If photo editors feel that using female photographers would shift their aesthetic, because we don’t have that male viewpoint, then they should let their aesthetic change a bit in order to include women

-Yael Malka

Jennilee Marigomen and I have also been talking about Canada specifically, and she says:

Although the market is a smaller scale here in Canada, I can agree with a lot of the points you have made from what I see happening here, but more so in other places. Because I have a full-time job, I am not actively pursuing work with magazines, so I haven’t really experienced sexism first hand. Because there is less work here, I am always humbled when I get commissions with my aesthetic in mind. 

As a side project, I work on an online magazine and receive photography submissions on a regular basis. Most of the pitches and submissions I receive are from males. Every person that has approached me about meeting to look at their portfolio has been male. I believe that I am pretty equal when it comes to commissioning and featuring work by photographers. I don’t concern myself with the gender of the artist and think that beautiful work is beautiful work. But I can only work with what is presented to me.

When I think of my favorite photographers, many of them are women. When I think of the successful female photographers I have met in different cities, they all have something in common - they are very inspiringly strong and confident women who do not shy away from sharing their work. Their work is as strong as their backbone. I guess these qualities are considered to be more masculine. They are the ones who win awards, competitions, get gallery shows, and land big clients.

I talked about this with a friend who works in the Product Design industry, also male dominated. Something he has seen over his years in Canada and Europe is that although the work can be good, there is sometimes a lack of confidence amongst some women. However, the ones who are confident stand out and the issue of them being a women is not relevant. 

I agree that photography has a long history of being a boys club and there are many factors that play into this - the pigeonholed female vs the male aesthetic, favoritism, sexism, gender stereotypes, etc. All very important topics. But one thing I can agree with is that when it comes to numbers males are more aggressive when it comes to approaching art buyers and photo editors, who see hundreds of portfolios a week.  And the females who I believe do the same are the ones who are successful. And I think that the people who do the hiring prefer to work with people that have a relationship.

In response to the point of female Photo Editors mainly hiring male photographers, I have almost always worked with female Photo Editors, all who have been very nice.

(Source: danielshea)

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read my cards last night and everything looks pretty awesome.  gotta find that magician card out there…

read my cards last night and everything looks pretty awesome.  gotta find that magician card out there…

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everydaypants:

everydaypantsnews:

I’ve been kind of quiet in terms of posting new comics online because I’ve been working on a new book, which I just finished! You can preorder it here (only ten bucks)! This will be a 270 page, hardcover book.

"Told through real-life journals, collages, lists, and drawings, this coming-of-age story illustrates the transformation of an 18-year-old girl from a small-town teenager into an independent city-dwelling college student. Written in an autobiographical style with beautiful artwork, Little Fish shows the challenges of being a young person facing the world on her own for the very first time and the unease—as well as excitement—that comes along with that challenge."

Coming in September!

Product Details

  • Reading level: Teen Nonfiction
  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Zest Books (September, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-13: 978-1-936976-18-8

This is my first time working with a publisher and it’s been a really fun and interesting experience. Also, stressful! I cranked out this 270 page book in under 6 months, which is mind-boggling to me since it took me an entire year to draw Year One. 

This book was inspired by my zine, List, which I’ve put out for the last ten years. It’s had 15 issues of its own. This isn’t an anthology, however. A large part of the content is entirely new (probably 85% of it), but I did borrow some lists from the earlier issues of my zine that I actually wrote when I was 18 and 19.

I also used entries straight out of my livejournal. I wasn’t sure how to tackle writing about my life as an 18 year old and was pretty afraid it wouldn’t feel authentic. My livejournal was key in remembering exactly how I felt back then, and using my actual words as an 18 year old was pretty fun and interesting. I’m glad I had a lot to say back then. 

If you’re a Year One reader, this is also the story of how I met Daniel.

Other things I learned about that year: the personal as the political, diy/punk ethics, feminism, privilege, discovered diary comics, made my first zine, etc. This was probably my most formative year in terms of who I am now.

Check it out! 

My new book is out today! 

My new book is aimed at older teens getting ready to go off to college (or people who have been through that experience, which I know is not everyone) and it’s all about my first year at art school in Baltimore. Bearing in mind that you may not be the target audience for this book, you might like it just because you know me and possibly knew me when I was going through that period in my life. Or you might know someone going off to college, or with a child who is at that stage. Its release date makes it a nice going away gift for a college-bound young person. Or maybe you, the person who is reading this, is someone from that demographic.

Some ways you can help- 

Buying the book: If you wanted to help me get a little higher kickback, you can purchase the book USING THIS LINK for Amazon specifically. 

 You can also purchase it here: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/little-fish-ramsey-beyer/1114267270

or you can find an Indie bookstore near you that carries it by going here: http://www.indiebound.org/book/9781936976188

Reviewing the Book: Another big way you can help is by reviewing my book on any of those sites once you’ve read it. More reviews means that it shows up higher on search lists, which can lead to better sales, especially if you review on Amazon and Barnes and Nobles. Reviews on Goodreads and Librarything are also helpful for spreading the word.  

Tell your friends in the book biz: If you know anyone who works at a library, a bookstore, or teaches high school, maybe spread the word about my book to them! That would rule. 

Thanks y’all! 

I’m so stoked this is out!  I just bought a copy for my niece who is in her first semester in college and sent it her way.  congrats ramsey!! 

(Source: )

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Ten Questions with Alyssa Marzolf

great interview with the lovely and talented Alyssa Marzolf!  thanks for the shout out boo!

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matthewavignone:

Shades of Darkness // A Photo Alumni Exhibition 
Curated by Matthew Avignone
Participating Artists - Brian Ulrich, Curtis Mann, Lisa Lindvay, Justin Schmitz, Josh Poehlein, Matt Austin, Meg T. Noe, Dan Bradica
September 3 - November 11
Opening Reception: September 18 from 5-8pm
 
C33 Gallery
33 E. Congress, Chicago IL
Hours: M-F: 9am –5pm, Sat: by appointment
Exhibition Contact: Justin Witte / jwitte@colum.edu / 312-369-8177 
(Photo Credit - Brian Ulrich, Jewel Food Store, Lake Meadows Ctr, Chicago 1954, Series: Great Prosperity) 
    

I’m so excited for this exhibtion, ya’ll!!! It’s the first show I’ve curated outside of The Coat Check/David Weinberg Photography. Please save the date, I hope to see you there! 

YUP

matthewavignone:

Shades of Darkness // A Photo Alumni Exhibition

Curated by Matthew Avignone

Participating Artists - Brian Ulrich, Curtis Mann, Lisa Lindvay, Justin Schmitz, Josh Poehlein, Matt Austin, Meg T. Noe, Dan Bradica


September 3 - November 11

Opening Reception: September 18 from 5-8pm

 

C33 Gallery

33 E. Congress, Chicago IL

Hours: M-F: 9am –5pm, Sat: by appointment

Exhibition Contact: Justin Witte / jwitte@colum.edu / 312-369-8177 


(Photo Credit - Brian Ulrich, Jewel Food Store, Lake Meadows Ctr, Chicago 1954, Series: Great Prosperity)

   


I’m so excited for this exhibtion, ya’ll!!! It’s the first show I’ve curated outside of The Coat Check/David Weinberg Photography. Please save the date, I hope to see you there!

YUP

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stuck in my head

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danielshea:

Once a year I make some of my work available as affordable prints to raise money for new projects. I will be traveling a few times in August and September to finish photographing and researching for my new book.

The images above are now available as 6.7x10” or 10x15” prints starting at $30. I’m printing these all myself, they are all archival pigment prints.

I will be adding new prints to this section every 2 weeks for the next 2 months. Email me at info@danielpshea.com if you have anything you’d like to see (must be from my 35mm archive).

Buy some prints, thanks for the support!

help daniel make new work!!

(Source: danielshea)

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